Tag Archives: sophia t

Guest Post: Just Ur Average

22 Apr

This is a guest post by Sophia T. She tweets @Just_urAverage with an ongoing list clearing-up what it means to be part of Generation Y (or Millenial, as I call it). She is from San Francisco. Her post below reflects many of the values of liberalart.us. She helps give voice to this story and her advice is sound. Interested in writing a guest post like Sophia? sayhello at liberalart dot us. -Ryan

I’m not your average college grad. I’m ambitious in every sense of the word, but my ambitions have not caught up to my resume or potential employment opportunities. Let me back-track and introduce myself, my name is Sophia. I graduated in 2009 with a B.A in Political Science. Unlike other college grads, I actually had a resume. I worked on my college campus as a student office assistant for two years. I had a summer internship in Washington D.C. working for an association, for God-sakes – yet my job prospects were slim, zero, zilch!  Like most college grads, I moved back with my parents. I uploaded my resume on Monster. I went to temp agencies. I read the “how-to-get a job” books, the how-to-network books, and most of the self-help section. Yes, I even read The Secret. When I did get the occasional job interview, I was clobbered. I went home depressed, disappointed, and ultimately defeated.

My turning-point came at one particular job interview when I was asked, “What have you been doing for the past year?” I said, “Personal growth.” I came out of the interview and I was pissed, “How dare they ask me something like that?” But deep down inside, I knew being pissed wasn’t going to be the answer.

I created @Just_urAverage not because of angst, but as a proactive way to voice my concerns for my generation and our democracy. You are not alone. The way employers treat young grads and young people, in general – is unfair. Writing covers letters, perfecting resumes, and cold calling potential employers are not going to get you the job and here are 10 reasons why:

  1. While the “too big to fail banks”, ran to the government asking for a hand-out. We asked, “What do we need to do to land jobs in a recession?” Where is our bail-out? There is none. Period.
  2. There’s a big empty blackhole on my current resume. How do I put survived the Great Recession on my resume? You can’t.
  3. Having a mind and knowing how to use it should be a marketable skill – but it isn’t.
  4. Volunteer work doesn’t pay for food or bills or anything else a person needs to survive. (Non-paid internships fall under this too.)
  5. Thinking of how far behind I am from my peers – in terms of a career is enough to get me depressed every time.
  6. Online job boards like Craigslist and Monster are nothing, but a source of frustration especially during a recession. Frankly, it is not the way most people find jobs.
  7. You must have concrete examples on your resume showing you can an indispensable part of an organization. The problem is teachers teach students how to be proven followers, not proven leaders.
  8. You don’t like solicitors. I don’t like solicitors. Don’t tell us to be solicitors in our job searches.
  9. Don’t waste our time being nice to us at an interview – letting us think we got the job. Then waiting a week to tell us: “We decided to go with a different candidate.” It’s torture.
  10. A decent job for a college grad should not be a prerogative especially in the US. Skyrocketing increases in tuition, plummeting revenue for state colleges (budget cuts), knee-high student loan debts + no job prospects = unacceptable.

A lot of us think that we have no control over how things are done, but let me tell you: the best way to voice your mind is through the ballot. Having a Black man become the President of the United States should be enough proof that – WE have the power to enact changes that are seemingly impossible.